Protection from unfair eviction

In order to protect tenants from unfair eviction a landlord must adhere to the following rules: 

  • Give you two months’ written notice once your fixed term tenancy has come to an end
  • Be able to prove grounds for eviction in court if they want you to move out before your tenancy ends
  • Landlords can not harass or try to force you out of a property without a court order

Talk to your local council if you feel you are being evicted unfairly.

Eviction changes due to coronavirus:
  • England: the notice period has been increased to six months
  • Wales: in most cases landlords must now give tenants six months’ notice 

Last updated: September 2020

Private Residential Tenancies protect tenants from unfair evictions as a landlord must adhere to the following rules: 

  • They can only evict you for a specified reason
  • They must give you written notice, the notice period varies depending on why you're being evicted and how long you have lived in the property
  • Landlords can only recover possession through court proceedings

If you think you are being evicted unfairly, you will have the opportunity to defend your eviction through a tribunal. See Citizens Advice Scotland for more information.

Eviction changes due to coronavirus:
  • In most cases landlords must now give tenants six months’ notice
  • A new law has made all grounds for eviction discretionary. This allows tribunals to consider the impact of coronavirus before issuing an eviction order

Last updated: September 2020

  • Your landlord must give you 28 days written notice via a ‘notice to quit’
  • Landlords can not harass or try to force you out of a property without a court order

Visit the NI Direct website for more information.

Eviction changes due to coronavirus:
  • Your landlord must now give you 12 weeks advance notice in writing before the date you have to leave
  • Your landlord or letting agent cannot force you to leave your rented home during the coronavirus outbreak

Last updated: September 2020

Challenge high rent increases

You have the right to challenge rent increases that you feel are unfair, the process is slightly different depending on where in the UK you live.

In order to prevent unfair rent increases, landlords must abide by the following rules: 

  • They must notify you before they increase the rent
  • The rent increase must be fair (i.e. on a similar level with average rents locally)
  • They must give you at least six months’ notice or one month if you are on a periodic tenancy

If you feel the rent increase is unfair, you should first speak to your landlord and try to come to an agreement. If you can not come to an agreement, you can ask a tribunal to decide for you. Visit the Citizens Advice website for more information.

In order to prevent unfair rent increases, there is a strict legal process that governs when landlords can increase your rent:

  • Rent can only be increased once a year
  • Your landlord must supply you with a Rent Increase Notice which includes a three-month period before the increase can take place

If you feel the rent increase is unfair, you can apply to Rent Service Scotland within 21 days of receiving the notice. A rent officer will look at your case and make a decision within 40 days.

In order to prevent unfair rent increases, landlords must abide by the following rules: 

  • Rent increases must be fair
  • They must notify you before increasing the rent
  • If you're on a fixed-term tenancy, your landlord must give you at least 28 days written notice
  • If you are on a periodic tenancy, your rent can be increased at the end of your rental period when you pay rent
  • Tenants have the right to cancel their tenancy agreement without penalty if no agreement can be reached

Tenancy information

Don't forget that as a tenant you are entitled by law to particular information about your tenancy. Make sure you are given:

  • A copy of the gas safety certificate (if the property has gas)
  • A copy of the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC)
  • The Government’s How to Rent guide (England only) 
  • Local authority licence (if the property is subject to a landlord licensing scheme)
  • Prescribed Information (see below)

The Prescribed Information is everything you need to know about the protection of your deposit. It will vary depending on the scheme used but will outline that your deposit has been protected and how you can check its status online. Having paid your deposit, it must be protected within a given timeframe and this will generate the Prescribed Information to then be issued to you. 

Tenancy Deposit Protection (TDP) explained

The Government introduced measures to make sure tenancy deposits are protected whilst they are with the landlord or letting agent. This guide covers everything you need to know.

Other tenant rights

Safe properties that meet a set standard
Regardless of where you are renting in the UK, as a tenant you have the right to live in a property that is in a good condition and safe.

Safety responsibilities for landlords

To help you get to grips with what’s expected, we have outlined the main safety concerns you need to be aware of and the legal obligations you must adhere to.

Quiet enjoyment
You have the right to live in the property undisturbed and what is dubbed as ‘quiet enjoyment’. This means that you have the right to use the property without unreasonable or unnecessary interference from the landlord or their letting agent.


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